Methamphetamine

Resources/contacts


If you or someone you know is having problems with drugs, help is available at:

Alcohol and Drug 24-Hour Helpline
800-562-1240

Crisis Clinic Resource Hotline
360-586-2800

True North-Student Assistance Services
360-339-8108

Providence St. Peter Chemical Dependency Center
800-332-0465

If you want to learn more about drug abuse or find information on particular drugs, the following links can be useful:

Drug dependence/abuse information by WebMD

Drug information and parenting advice

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s family guide to underage drinking

The Partnership at DrugFree.org has information for parents in English and in Spanish, along with a drug guide

 

Ohio State University Medical Center describes substance abuse and chemical dependence in an easy-to-read manner and answers frequent questions.

What is meth?
Methamphetamine is an illegal, highly addictive drug. A powerful cousin of amphetamines, it is taken by swallowing in pill form, or by smoking, inhaling or injecting the powdered or crystalline form. It goes by many names, among them crank, speed, ice and crystal.


How does meth affect people who use it?
Depending on how is it taken, it initially produces feelings of confidence, alertness and energy. If injected or smoked, users also get a "rush" or intense pleasure that lasts a short time. Effects can last from four to six hours. When the drug wears off, the supply of brain chemicals producing these good feelings is depleted, and users experience a period of feeling "low." Over time, the good feelings become less; the user has difficulty feeling good or experiencing pleasure even while using the drug.


What effects does meth have on the body?
Because meth is a powerful stimulant, effects include:

Learning and memory problems

Insomnia

Decreased appetite and anorexia

Increased heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature

Tremors or convulsions

Lung, kidney and liver damage

Irreversible damage to blood vessels in the brain, which can produce stroke

Decaying teeth

Increased risk of getting or transmitting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and other diseases for users who inject, share needles or have unprotected sex


What signs might indicate that someone is using meth?
Among the symptoms you could notice are:

Tremors

Confusion

Weakness

Hallucinations

Dry mouth

Fatigue

Cough

Irritability

Sweating

Paranoia

Burned lips

Depression

Sore nose

Anger

Headaches

Loss of concentration

Diarrhea

Psychosis


Online resources:

Life or Meth, a resource geared toward 5th- and 6th-graders but that has good information for all ages.

Partnership for a Drug-Free America has news and information for families, and information about meth. They also have a meth resource page.

The Thurston County Meth Action Team’s resource page on "The Meth Monster"

You can also check out the Meth Action Team’s "Meth Monster" brochure.

Just Think Twice

Meth resources from the federal government

Information on methamphetamine from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration

Meth addiction information


Click on the drugs listed below to find out more about them:


Alcohol
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Cocaine
Codeine
Crack
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GHB
Hashish
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Methadone
Methamphetamine (meth)
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Opium
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PCP (phencyclidine)
Percocet (oxycodone)
Peyote/mescaline
Pseudoephedrine
Quaaludes
Rohypnol (roofies)
Steroids
Stimulants
Tobacco
Tranquilizers
Valium
Vicodin (hydrocodone)